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Advanced cardiac care to get you back to those you love

WATCHMAN: A One-Time Implant that Helps Reduce AFib Stroke Risk

CHI Memorial and The Chattanooga Heart Institute now offer WATCHMAN, a permanent implant that offers an alternative to the lifelong use of blood thinners.

How does AFib increase stroke risk?

The average person with atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF) is five times more likely to have a stroke than someone with a regular heartbeat.1 That’s because when one is in atrial fibrillation the upper chamber is quivering instead of pumping.  The lower chamber which is the main pumping chamber is still pumping blood to the body normally.  The quivering in the upper chambers allows for the blood to coagulate or connect together and form a clot. Most of these clots form in a structure called the left atrial appendage (LAA). If a blood clot forms it can escape from the LAA and go to anywhere in the body.  If it goes to the brain it can cause a stroke.

Learn more about atrial fibrillation and stroke risk.

In people with atrial fibrillation not caused by heart valve problems (the most common type of AFib), more than 90% of stroke-causing clots that come from the heart are formed in the LAA.3  

Learn more about types of AFib, symptoms and risks, and treatment for Afib.

 

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More than 90% of stroke-causing clots that come from the heart are formed in the LAA

Reducing AFib stroke risk

Blood thinners, also called anticoagulants, are an effective way to lower the risk of stroke in people with atrial fibrillation not caused by heart valve problems.5 

But some people need an alternative to blood thinners, because they can increase the risk of bleeding.5 Some bleeding events are minor and easily treated, like a cut taking longer than normal to stop bleeding. In other cases, the bleeding can be life-threatening, such as when bleeding in the brain causes a stroke.

If you have a history of bleeding or a lifestyle, occupation or condition that puts you at risk for bleeding, your doctor may consider an alternative to blood thinners, such as the WATCHMAN Implant.

An Alternative to blood thinners

WATCHMAN is a permanent implant that offers an alternative to the lifelong use of blood thinners. It’s about the size of a quarter and made from very light and compact materials commonly used in many other medical implants.

 

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The WATCHMAN Implant is about the size of a quarter and made from very light and compact materials commonly used in many medical implants.

How WATCHMAN works

WATCHMAN effectively reduces the risk of stroke by permanently closing off the LAA to keep blood clots from escaping. WATCHMAN can eliminate the bleeding risks and regular blood tests and food-and-drink restrictions that come with taking an anticoagulant. In a clinical trial, 9 out of 10 people were able to stop taking an anticoagulant just 45 days after the WATCHMAN procedure.6

 

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In a clinical trial, 9 out of 10 people were able to stop taking an anticoagulant just 45 days after the WATCHMAN procedure.

How is WATCHMAN implanted?

WATCHMAN is implanted into your heart in a one-time procedure. To implant WATCHMAN, your doctor makes a small cut in your upper leg and inserts a narrow tube, as done in a standard stent procedure. Your doctor then guides WATCHMAN into your heart’s LAA. The procedure is done under general anesthesia and takes about an hour. Patients commonly stay in the hospital overnight and leave the next day. 

See how the WATCHMAN Implant procedure works to help reduce stroke risk in people with atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart problem.

After the procedure

Following the WATCHMAN procedure, you’ll take your regular anticoagulant for 45 days or until your LAA is significantly closed off.  During this time, heart tissue will grow over the implant to form a barrier against blood clots. Your doctor will monitor this process by taking pictures of your heart to see when you can stop taking your anticoagulant.  

In a clinical trial:

  • 92% of patients were able to stop taking an anticoagulant just 45 days after the procedure6
  • 99% of patients were able to stop taking an anticoagulant within 1 year after the procedure6

Is WATCHMAN right for you?

If you have a history of bleeding or a lifestyle, occupation or condition that puts you at risk for bleeding, WATCHMAN may be right for you. But like any medical procedure, WATCHMAN comes with risks, so it isn’t right for everyone. Your cardiologist will weigh your risk of a stroke against your risk of a serious bleeding problem to determine the right treatment for you.

Take the WATCHMAN Assessment to see if WATCHMAN is right for you.

 

Hear from a WATCHMAN Patient

When atrial fibrillation and the bleeding risks of blood thinners started to slow down Ingrid, an active 55-year-old, she talked to her doctor about an alternative treatment. See how WATCHMAN helped give her a new lease on life.

See how the WATCHMAN Implant helped give Ingrid a new lease on life after AFib and the bleeding risks of blood thinners started to slow her down.

Getting WATCHMAN

The first step to finding out if you’re a candidate for WATCHMAN is making an appointment with a cardiologist at The Chattanooga Heart Institute to discuss your options.

For more information, call (423)697-3550.

WATCHMAN is for people with atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem who need an alternative to an anticoagulant. This website is intended to provide patients and caregivers with some information about the WATCHMAN Implant. It may help prepare you for talking to your doctor about your options for reducing stroke risk.

 

Important Safety Information

The WATCHMAN Device is a permanent implant designed to close the left atrial appendage in the heart in an effort to reduce the risk of stroke.

With all medical procedures there are risks associated with the implant procedure and the use of the device. The risks include but are not limited to accidental heart puncture, air embolism, allergic reaction, anemia, anesthesia risks, arrhythmias, AV (Arteriovenous) fistula, bleeding or throat pain from the TEE (Trans Esophageal Echo) probe, blood clot or air bubbles in the lungs or other organs, bruising at the catheter insertion site, clot formation on the WATCHMAN™ Closure Device, cranial bleed, excessive bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, groin puncture bleed, hypotension, infection/pneumonia, pneumothorax, pulmonary edema, pulmonary vein obstruction, renal failure, stroke, thrombosis, transient ischemic attack device embolization, fluid around the heart and need for open heart surgery. In rare cases death can occur.

Be sure to talk with your doctor so that you thoroughly understand all of the risks and benefits associated with the implantation of the WATCHMAN Device. 

 

Sources

  1. National Stroke Association. Making the Afib-Stroke Connection. https://www.stroke.org/sites/default/files/resources/Afib-Connection%20for%20hcp.pdf. Published 2012. Accessed September 1, 2016.
  2. Harvard Health Publications. Atrial fibrillation. http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/atrial-fibrillation-common-serious-treatable. Harvard University Medical School. Published November 2011. Accessed August 25, 2016.
  3. Blackshear JL, Odell JA. Appendage obliteration to reduce stroke in cardiac surgical patients with atrial fibrillation. Ann Thorac Surg. 1996;61:755-759.
  4. Cleveland Clinic. Atrial fibrillation (Afib). http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/heart/disorders/arrhythmia/atrial-fibrillation-afib. Published May 2015. Accessed August 25, 2016.
  5. National Stroke Association. Making the Afib-Stroke Connection. https://www.stroke.org/sites/default/files/resources/Afib-Connection%20for%20hcp.pdf. Published 2012. Accessed September 1, 2016.
  6. Holmes DR Jr, Kar S, Price MJ, et al. Prospective randomized evaluation of the Watchman Left Atrial Appendage Closure device in patients with atrial fibrillation versus long-term warfarin therapy: the PREVAIL trial. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;64(1):1-12.

 


For more information or to schedule an appointment for an evaluation, please call CHI Memorial’s MitraClip® Valve Coordinator at (423) 495-4327.



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